References

Collaboration Tools

We understand that every collaborative relationship is unique and will grow in its own way. To address the evolving needs of practitioners, the tools and worksheets in this toolkit are organized by essential elements inherent to successful collaborations.

If you are new to collaboration, explore tools included under the first element—Understanding the Basics. If you are already collaborating with partners, browse the elements that correspond with where you are in the collaboration process. This just-in-time approach lets you access the information you need to move your prevention efforts forward.

We have also added a separate section of tools designed to facilitate collaboration with the range of new partners needed to address the current opioid crisis.

Ayre, D., Clough, G. and Norris, T. (2002). Facilitating community change handbook. Grove Consultants and International Community Initiatives, LLC.

Backer, T. (2003). Evaluating community collaborations: An overview. In T. Backer (Ed.), Evaluating Community Collaborations (pp. 1-18). New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company.

Berkowitz, Bill. (2015). Methods of contacting potential participants. Retrieved from http://ctb.ku.edu/

Brown, L. D., Feinberg, M. E., & Greenberg, M. T. (2010). Determinants of community coalition ability to support evidence-based programs. Prevention Science: The Official Journal of the Society for Prevention Research, 11(3), 287-297.

Brown, L. D., Feinberg, M. E., & Greenberg, M. T. (2012). Measuring coalition functioning: Refining constructs through factor analysis. Health Education & Behavior, 39(4), 486-497.

Brown, L. D., Feinberg, M. E., & Kan, M. L. (2012). Predicting engagement in a transition to parenthood program for couples.Evaluation and Program Planning, 35(1), 1-8.

Brownless, T., & Lee, K. (2015). Building culturally competent organizations. Retrieved from http://ctb.ku.edu/

Brubach, A. (2004). Sustainability: Principles of collaborative leadership. Alexandria, VA: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America.

Carger E., & Westen D. (2010). A new way to talk about the social determinants of health. Princeton, NJ: The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Center for Prevention Research and Development. (2006). Evidence-based practices for effective community coalitions. Champaign, IL: Center for Prevention Research and Development, Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois.

County Health Rankings & Roadmaps (2015). 27-9-3 tool: Developing your persuasive message. Retrieved from: http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/

Education Development Center, Inc. (2013). Benefits to potential partners: What’s in it for them? Retrieved from http://www.promoteprevent.org

Education Development Center, Inc. (2013). How do we make our case? Creating the elevator pitch. Retrieved from http://www.promoteprevent.org

Education Development Center, Inc. (2013). How do we create an agreement for working together? Retrieved from http://www.promoteprevent.org

Education Development Center, Inc. (2013). How do we make decisions? Retrieved from http://www.promoteprevent.org

Frey, B. B., Lohmeier, J. H., Lee, S. W., & Tollefson, N. (2006). Measuring collaboration among grant partners. American Journal of Evaluation, 27(3), 383-392.

Mulroy, E., Palacios, R., & Ruiz, J. (2014). Recruitment guidelines for engagement strategies. Retrieved from http://www.communitycatalyst.org/

Riggs, N. R., Nakawatase, M., & Pentz, M. A. (2008). Promoting community coalition functioning: Effects of Project STEP. Prevention Science: The Official Journal of the Society for Prevention Research, 9(2), 63-72.

Suicide Prevention Resource Center (2013). SPRC substance abuse and suicide prevention collaboration continuum. Retrieved from http://www.sprc.org